ARSA Applauds TSA on Repair Station Security Rule

WASHINGTON – On July 28, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) issued long-promised guidance adopting ARSA’s position regarding when an on-airport repair station is responsible for large aircraft on its property under the new aircraft repair station security regulation.

In response to a Feb. 24 ARSA inquiry, the agency clarified that a “repair station is responsible for large aircraft when the repair station has authority over the aircraft, contractual dominion or control of the aircraft, or when the repair station knows or should know that a large aircraft has been tendered to them by an aircraft owner or operator.”  Furthermore, TSA explained that it “considers the repair station to be responsible for the large aircraft until the aircraft owner or operator has taken delivery and/or control of the aircraft.”

“We commend TSA for adjusting its guidance to reflect operational realities and the agency’s own requirements and practices,” said ARSA’s Vice President of Legislative Affairs Daniel B. Fisher.  “Conflicting security requirements create inefficiencies and undue burdens while causing confusion for everyone involved. We look forward to a continued partnership with TSA on implementation and compliance with the repair station security rule.”

ARSA is an Alexandria, Virginia-based trade association that represents aviation maintenance and manufacturing companies. Founded in 1984, the association has a distinguished record of advocating for repair stations, providing regulatory compliance assistance to the industry, and representing repair stations on Capitol Hill and in the media. More information is available at www.arsa.org.

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