EPA Adopts ACMA Recommended Reforms

August 7, 2013 (Arlington, VA) — The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced several significant changes to the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program following longstanding advocacy by the American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA).

IRIS is EPA’s central database on health effects that may result from exposure to chemicals. Styrene and other chemicals in composites manufacturing are on the list of substances for which EPA is expected to update IRIS profiles.

“EPA’s acceptance of changes supported by ACMA and other business groups illustrate the importance of maintaining a constructive dialogue with regulatory agencies. Both the manufacturing community and the general public benefit when the government and industry can collaborate on the best ways to improve the public health,” says ACMA Chairman Jay Merrell of Norplex-Micarta.

ACMA’s recommended improvements, now adopted by EPA, include meaningful agency consultation with external scientists early in the review of a chemical, full disclosure of all data and information under consideration by the agency, peer review of all substantive public concerns with a draft assessment and use of a predictable, balanced and thorough approach to data evaluation.

“ACMA will continue to work with our coalition of more than 30 trade associations to improve the manner in which the government conducts and evaluates science,” says ACMA President Tom Dobbins.

About ACMA

Representing more than 3,000 companies, the American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA) is the world’s largest trade group representing the composites industry, providing strong, proactive leadership in technical, government and regulatory affairs. In the U.S. alone, the composites industry employs about 550,000 people and generates almost $70 billion in revenues per year. In addition, ACMA and SAMPE produce CAMX — The Composites and Advanced Materials Expo – the one source for connecting and advancing all aspects of the world’s Composites and Advanced Materials communities.

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