Boeing Consolidates Aviation Training Organizations Under the Alteon Name

SEATTLE, Oct. 02, 2008 -- The Boeing Company [NYSE: BA] announced today it is combining Alteon, a wholly owned subsidiary, and existing training groups within Boeing Commercial Airplanes to form a new, unified training organization. The new training organization retains the Alteon name as a business unit within Boeing Commercial Aviation Services.

"The combined expertise of our Commercial Airplanes and Alteon teams will better serve our customers' training needs by providing them with a more comprehensive suite of aviation training and flight services," said Lou Mancini, vice president and general manager of Commercial Aviation Services. "This is yet another way that Boeing is helping to ensure our airline customers operate more efficiently."

The new organization takes advantage of both Commercial Airplanes and Alteon resources to provide customers with a single integrated business that encompasses all development, deployment and delivery of aviation training and flight services. It also supports both customers who need courseware and instructor-led training as well as those who need only to rent simulator time. In addition, for those customers who have invested in their own simulators, Alteon can provide Boeing data and hardware to operate the simulators as well as updates and upgrades.

"With the new organization, we will be able to present a single face to the customer across our global network and a consistent level of excellence in aviation services," said Sherry Carbary, president of Alteon. "This consolidation reinforces our commitment to pursuing innovative solutions to meet our customers' needs by providing a comprehensive portfolio of capabilities in training and flight services delivered by our skilled and impassioned work force."

The new organization includes 1,400 training professionals. Alteon serves more than 400 customers around the world, delivering 330 training programs accepted by more than 100 regulatory authorities. It has more than 100 full-flight simulators in 20 locations on six continents.

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