Four to Be Inducted into Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame

Wetaskiwin, Alberta, January 11, 2010 - Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame (CAHF) will induct four Canadians at its 2010 annual dinner and ceremony at the River Rock Casino and Hotel in Vancouver, B.C., June 10.

This year’s inductees’ achievements span over 90 years of flight. From flying in two world wars, in space and in remote, dangerous conditions, within military, medevac, private and commercial sectors, this year’s inductees epitomize the Canadian spirit represented by the CAHF.

The 2010 inductees are Canadian former Chief Astronaut Julie Payette, a pilot, engineer, and musician who has logged more than 1,200 hours flying and 25 days in space; inspirational female flight instructor Vi Milstead Warren, who also worked in remote and dangerous conditions as Canada’s first female bush pilot. WW1 fighter pilot Redford Henry “Red” Mulock will also be inducted; he is recognized for his combat flying in WW1 with a Distinguished Service Order and as a Companion of the British Empire who rose to the rank of RCAF Reserve Air Commodore; northern bush pilot Willy Laserich will also be inducted; he flew over 3,000 medevac flights and 100 search and rescue missions.

Since its establishment in 1973, just 196 individuals have been honored for their achievements in advancing Canadian aviation and space endeavors. All inductees have played integral roles in Canada’s strong aviation history; roles that contributed significantly to Canada’s technical and commercial growth. These four honorees bring the total to 200.

Julie Payette (1963 - ) is a multilingual pilot, musician and singer who epitomizes the talents and education of Canadians selected as astronauts. She logged more than 1,200 hours as a pilot, before becoming the chief astronaut of the Canadian Space Agency from 2000 to 2007. Julie has now spent more than 25 days in space where she supervised a spacewalk for space shuttle Discovery, operated the ‘Canadarm’ robotic arm, served as mission specialist on a number of operations, and as flight engineer aboard space shuttle Endeavor.

Vi Milstead Warren (1919 - ) is a pilot and role model for women in aviation. She achieved the rank of first officer working for the Air Transport Authority in WW2 flying more than 47 types of aircraft. Following the war, she worked as Canada’s first female flying instructor, before breaking new ground as Canada’s first female bush pilot flying in some of the country’s most remote and dangerous conditions. In 2004, she was inducted as a Member of the Order of Canada.

Redford Henry “Red” Mulock (1886-1961) of Winnipeg, distinguished himself as one of Canada’s most highly skilled pilots, earning the Distinguished Service Order in his first year of service with the Royal Naval Air Service during WW1. His extraordinary career trajectory continued as he rose in rank and responsibility through the Royal Air Force. As group captain he led a bomber group, and following the war was honored as a Companion of the British Empire, going on to join Canadian Airways Ltd and rising to the rank of air commodore in the RCAF reserve.

Willy Laserich (1932 – 2007) earned admiration as both an individual and as a pilot during his career. He maintained a perfect safety record for 50 years, but was also known as someone who could take calculated risks. He continually campaigned for better air services and facilities for the people of the Northwest Territories. He flew more than 3,000 medevac flights, more than 100 search and rescue operations and saw six babies born aboard his aircraft.

Brief History of The Hall:

Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame is located in the hangar at the Reynolds-Alberta Museum in Wetaskiwin, Alberta, south of Edmonton. Founded in 1973, Members have come from all across Canada and have led extraordinary lives as military and civilian pilots, doctors, scientists, inventors, aeronautical engineers and administrators.

Loading