Dassault Falcon Becomes First OEM to Receive FAA Approval for Both 3D Type Design and Completions Process

(Little Rock, Arkansas, December 17, 2010) – Dassault Falcon has received approval from the FAA for the use of 3D data for type design in the completions process of Falcon aircraft. The approval applies to completions for production aircraft, including the Falcon 900 and 2000 series, as well as the 7X. Dassault previously received approval for 3D data on the basic design of the Falcon 7X when it was jointly certified by the FAA and the EASA in 2007, making it the first aircraft to be fully approved for the use of 3D data throughout the entire manufacturing process.

“FAA approval for 3D data to be used exclusively throughout the completions process of Falcon aircraft not only reflects Dassault’s philosophy of utilizing the highest level of technology to increase quality but also sets a new standard for how airworthiness authorities will accept and validate new aircraft designs going forward,” said John Rosanvallon, President and CEO of Dassault Falcon.

The 7X was the first Falcon to be designed fully within the framework of Dassault’s Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) philosophy. The program set the groundwork for the incorporation of 3D data from the manufacturing process through to completions and operations. Key benefits include greater accuracy during the spec and design process, including the opportunity for the customer to visualize the final configuration of the aircraft. Definition of the aircraft specification in 3D also ensures compatibility of component placement with maintenance activities and a higher overall quality of the completions process.

The approval process to validate the use of 3D data in completions activities was the result of nearly two years of collaboration between Dassault Falcon and the FAA, including more than 60 meetings held with the agency’s three main branches (ACO, MIDO, FSDO). The approval required Dassault Falcon to develop detailed processes for the use, storage and long-term retention of 3D data, including disaster recovery plans. Additionally, Dassault Falcon developed an extensive training program for those involved in the process.

7X Background

Announced at the Paris Air Show in 2001, the Falcon 7X is the first business jet with a digital flight control system and was also the first to be simultaneously certified by both the EASA and the FAA on April 27, 2007. It features the award-winning EASy Flight Deck and is powered by three Pratt & Whitney Canada PW307A engines.

The Falcon 7X has the longest range of any Falcon business jet and is the most fuel efficient jet in its class. Its 5,950 nm range (eight passengers, M.80 with NBAA IFR reserves) can comfortably connect 95% of the commonly used business aviation city pairs.

The cabin has 28 windows which are 10% bigger than previous Falcons. It also features a low inflight cabin altitude of 6,000 feet, even while cruising at an altitude of 51,000 feet, and an advanced temperature control system that maintains the environment to within one degree throughout the entire cabin. Internal sound levels have been reduced to 52 dB which is the result of breakthroughs in design, materials and cushioned engine mounts.

Dassault Falcon Backgrounder:

Dassault Falcon is responsible for selling and supporting Falcon business jets throughout the world. It is part of Dassault Aviation, a leading aerospace company with a presence in over 70 countries across five continents. Dassault Aviation produces the Rafale fighter jet as well as the complete line of Falcon business jets. The company has assembly and production plants in both France and the United States and service facilities on multiple continents. It employs a total workforce of over 12,000. Since the rollout of the first Falcon 20 in 1963, 2,000 Falcon jets have been delivered to 67 countries worldwide. The family of Falcon jets currently in production includes the tri-jets—the Falcon 900EX EASy, 900LX, and the 7X — as well as the twin-engine 2000LX.

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