Roger, Over, & Out

Information Technology

Roger, Over, & Out

Ground communication equipment is necessary in the maneuvering of aircraft, but it is also critical to safety and security for ground support personnel, writes Michelle Garetson.

By Michelle Garetson

May 2002

Ground support personnel face many distractions, including high noise levels, on an active airport ramp. Add to this the post-9/11 security procedures and the charge to reduce, if not eliminate, runway incursions by ground crews; having the proper equipment to communicate with aircraft, as well as other workers, is critical to efficiency, security, and safety on the ramp.

The following is a sample of some of the new developments in ground communications.

HEADSETS AND RADIOS

Protecting aircraft and ground crew is crucial during push-back so the communication has to be clear to ensure the safety of people and equipment. The David Clark Company offers Noise Attenuating Headsets that provide the hearing protection required (Model H3530 offers a Noise Reduction Rating [NRR] of 24dB). Their Noise Canceling Microphones ensure clear, crisp transmission regardless of the noise level.

David Clark Co.'s Model H3530 Headset

David Clark Co.'s Model H3530 Headset

Kenwood's ProTalk XLS radio

Kenwood's ProTalk XLS radio

Comprehensive Technical Solutions Inc.'s new ProMod MAX Headset is completely modular, which means that every component that makes up the headset system can be serviced instantly, now offers an average of 36 percent better sound attenuation at frequencies below 1,000 Hz.

Because ramp workers have a wide area to cover when servicing aircraft, radios are often necessary to communicate from one end of the field to the other. Kenwood Communications has introduced a palm-sized, 2-way radio; the Pro Talk XLS, which offers a four-mile range and transmits ultra high frequency (UHF) radio signals providing a reliable communication link.

This month, AvComm of Covina, CA launches a new line of communications equipment specific to ground support.

GOING WIRELESS
CeoTronics AG's CT-GateCom Wireless Systems include Ground-Com headsets, communication systems for aircraft movers, maintenance headsets, and two-way radio communication equipment for airport firefighters and security services.

ARINC's AviNetsm Wireless Dispatch Service is based on Motorola's iDEN technology and offers the capabilities of a cell phone, pager, and radio in one device. It allows ramp personnel to be connected digitally to all areas of the airport — ramp to plane, cargo tracking, baggage matching, storm warning procedures, and more. AviNet also provides site-to-site calls (e.g. airport-to-airport) and this system is to be implemented in nine major airports by first quarter 2002.

ARINC
2551 Riva Rd., Annapolis, MD 21401
800-633-6882; www.arinc.com

AVCOMM
1025 W. San Bernardino Rd.,
Covina, CA 91722
800-845-7541; www.avcomminc.com

CeoTronics AG
Adam-Opel-STR. 6, D-63322,
Rodermark, Germany
+49.0.60.74.87.51.0; www.ceotronics.com

Comprehensive Technical Solutions
1 Bank St., Orchard Park, NY 14127
716-667-2714; www.4cts.com

David Clark
360 Franklin St., Box 15054,
Worcester, MA 01615
508-751-5800; www.davidclark.com

Kenwood Communications
3975 Johns Creek Rd.
Suwanee, GA 30024
800-950-5005; www.kenwood.net

Loading