South Carolina lands Boeing

Second Dreamliner base to bring 3,800 jobs


Other lawmakers acknowledged concerns South Carolina could be a pawn in high-stakes negotiations between Boeing and Washington state, the other finalist for the new plant.

"Any two parties in a negotiation could play one party against another party that made an offer," state Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Charleston said while waiting on the announcement. "It's always a risk you run. ... (But) I think they are legitimately interested in us."

Later, Campsen said the state's lower taxes and good quality of life were crucial factors in attracting Boeing.

When the Senate approved the incentives earlier Wednesday, "We had no idea Boeing was going to come here," Leatherman said. "As late as 4:30 (p.m. Wednesday), there was no decision."

A call from Boeing came about 5 p.m., unleashing cheers in the Senate while House lawmakers donned palmetto tree pins with wings. In the lobby, Sanford waited to personally thank Leatherman and McConnell -- both of whom he frequently has criticized in the past.

"In terms of jobs, it's an incredible shot in the arm," Sanford said, in a nod to the state's 11.6 percent jobless rate. "Timing is of the essence."

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