American Airlines Awarded Frequencies for New Brazil Service

FORT WORTH, Texas, June 24 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- American Airlines, a member of the global oneworld® Alliance, has been awarded by the United States Department of Transportation rights to fly 11 new flights per week between the United States and Brazil beginning Nov. 18.

"Brazil is an ever-expanding South American market, and we thank the U.S. Department of Transportation for granting American the authority to operate these new flights, including the only nonstop service between New York City and Rio de Janeiro by a U.S. carrier," said Will Ris, American's Senior Vice President - Government Affairs. "Additionally, our new service to Brasilia from Miami - our largest U.S. gateway to Brazil and to all of South America - will be the first service in a long while from a U.S. carrier."

"I am thrilled that American Airlines continues to add service from its hub at Miami International Airport," said Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Alvarez. "The addition of Brasilia, the sixth destination in Brazil served by American from Miami, further solidifies Miami-Dade County's position as the Gateway to the Americas."

"We're excited that American Airlines will be launching new, daily nonstop service from Rio de Janeiro to NYC in November. As a key source of business and leisure travelers, Brazil is an important and growing market for New York City. We applaud the U.S. Department of Transportation for granting American this new route, and look forward to welcoming more Brazilian travelers to the nation's largest city in the years ahead," said George Fertitta, CEO of NYC & Company, the city's official marketing, tourism and partnership organization.

Flights will be available for sale beginning Sunday, June 27, 2010. The new schedules are as follows (all times local):

American will fly between New York and Rio de Janeiro using 225-seat Boeing 767-300 aircraft, which accommodate 30 Business Class and 195 Economy Class passengers. American will offer convenient connections to Rio de Janeiro via New York JFK for a number of major U.S. cities, including Boston, Washington, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, and Raleigh/Durham.

Between Miami and Brasilia, American will fly 182-seat Boeing 757 aircraft that accommodate 16 Business Class and 166 Economy Cabin passengers.

American will offer easy connections to Brasilia via Miami from more than 40 U.S. cities including Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas/Fort Worth, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, New York, Newark, Orlando, Philadelphia, Raleigh/Durham, San Francisco, San Juan, St. Louis, and Tampa.

The new service complements American's other service and partnerships in Latin America. American has codeshare and frequent flyer agreements with LAN and Mexicana, both members of the oneworld Alliance, and GOL. With the new service, American will serve 42 destinations in 17 countries within the region.

About American Airlines

American Airlines, American Eagle and AmericanConnection® serve 250 cities in 40 countries with, on average, more than 3,400 daily flights. The combined network fleet numbers more than 900 aircraft. American's award-winning website, AA.com®, provides users with easy access to check and book fares, plus personalized news, information and travel offers. American Airlines is a founding member of the oneworld® Alliance, which brings together some of the best and biggest names in the airline business, enabling them to offer their customers more services and benefits than any airline can provide on its own. Together, its members serve nearly 700 destinations in more than 130 countries and territories. American Airlines, Inc. and American Eagle Airlines, Inc. are subsidiaries of AMR Corporation. AmericanAirlines, American Eagle, AmericanConnection, AA.com, We know why you fly and AAdvantage are registered trademarks of American Airlines, Inc. (NYSE: AMR)

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The address is http://www.aa.com

SOURCE American Airlines

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