AMTSociety Update

The Mission Continues

As many of you know I have accepted the position of AMTSociety's next Executive Director and Business Manager.

As I mentioned in the May 22nd announcement, I am honored and excited to take a leadership role in this premier aircraft maintenance organization. I will continue the hard work of the past seven years, toward the vision of Tom Hendershot and the AMTSociety Board of Director, while looking to create new opportunities and benefits for our members and industry partners.

Our industry experiences its share of challenges affecting companies, organizations, and individuals. Successful organizations must adapt to industry trends, economic factors, and member needs. AMTSociety is now progressing through its own period of transition. As with most industry groups, we operate with a talented group of volunteers who dedicate their time and expertise to not only help guide the AMTSociety but to also work on programs and initiatives. It's common during periods of transition for those closest to reevaluate their own personal role. Turnover is an expected outcome of volunteerism.

With the unexpected loss of our past Executive Director, several of those dedicated individuals who have tirelessly volunteered their talents for many years have chosen this time to focus on other important parts of life such as family and careers. I want to personally thank Peter Zeeb, Joe Hawkins, and Ken MacTiernan for all they have done for the AMTSociety.

One thing should be clear, the AMTSociety is moving forward! Transition presents an opportunity to consider new people and new ideas; a healthy trait of a progressive organization. We are evaluating what talents and expertise are best suited for board members, advisors, and volunteers as AMTSociety continues with its important mission. The schedule for the next AMTSociety Roadshow Consortium which provides relevant training sessions for all AMTs is currently being established. The student scholarship program will continue. And finally the crown jewel which Ken and others did such a fine job with, the AMTSociety's Maintenance Skills Competition, will be held just as in the past.

If anyone has a question, comment, or just feels like talking you can contact me directly at ron.donner@aviationpros.com.

Thank you,
Ronald (Ron) Donner – AMTSociety Executive Director and Business Manager 

Human Fatigue

Did you know that human fatigue can be just as dangerous as metal fatigue? Sleep loss and extended duty hours can leave you with progressive and localized structural damage to your body and your organization. Repeatedly not getting enough sleep is believed to increase the risk of a variety of chronic medical problems, including obesity, depression, gastrointestinal problems, compromised immune function, substance abuse, and cardiovascular disease.

Fatigue risk management systems are widely used to manage fatigue among flight crews, the railroad industry, and drivers of commercial vehicles, among others. Successful implementation of an FRMS in these industries has yielded substantial improvements in personal health and well-being, as well as significant improvements in safety and reductions in organizational costs. Despite the documented benefits of fatigue risk management systems, they are still uncommon within many aircraft maintenance organizations.

Dr. Bill Johnson the chief scientific and technical advisor for Maintenance Human Factors at the FAA stated in a March 2013 article in Aircraft Maintenance Technology (AMT) Magazine, the FAA has created a variety of products and tools to address human factors within your organization. These FAA human factors products are available at www.mxfatigue.com. Another source of information is www.faasafety.gov, the website maintained by the FAA Safety Team. This site offers many online courses, access to CDs and information about safety events in your area. 

AMT Day

Baker’s School of Aeronautics once again held an AMT Day picnic. Approximately 140 people attended. Ronnie Wilson and the Under the Hill Gang played country and rock and roll music from the ‘60s. 125 door prizes were given out, including tools, gift certificates, hats, and t-shirts.

The National Airline History Museum at the Wheeler Downtown Airport (MKC) is honored to display this exhibit dedicated to Charles E. Taylor and the Kansas City Area recipients of this distinguished award. Most of the honorees pictured in the display (shown at left) were associated with the former TWA Overhaul Base at Kansas City International Airport (MCI). During guided tours, guests at the museum are given a presentation which details the history of Taylor and his contribution to the aviation industry.

San Joaquin Valley College Aviation Campus in Fresno, CA, has approximately 75 students at this time and on May 30 it held its AMT Day celebration. There was cake for all the students and staff, and then afterwards SJVC had an academic decathlon with the General, Powerplant, Airframe classes competing along with the instructors. There were competitions between the four teams in safety wire, fluid line making, hardware identification, weight and balance, electrical troubleshooting, and FAR Jeopardy game. All had fun, but unfortunately for the students, the instructor team showed they had the right stuff by winning in the majority of the competitions.

Banyan celebrated its 8th annual AMT Day on Friday, May 24, 2013. It uses the day to honor its aircraft maintenance technicians, Avionics team and Parts team for their dedication to quality and safety.

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