2012 Top 40 Under Forty: Jason Terreri

Jason Terreri

Aviation Contract Administrator;

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

Date of Birth: 10-31-77

Years in Aviation: 16

Jason Terreri serves as aviation contract administrator for the Maynard H. Jackson Jr. International Terminal at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

He oversees and administers contracts related to the 40-gate international terminal complex, common-use facilities and equipment, and ancillary support functions.

Terreri’s professional goal is to manage a medium or large-hub commercial air service airport, and he has built his career path with this objective in mind. Terreri has worked in nearly every aviation sector, beginning as a commercial pilot and flight instructor before transitioning to airport management.

At Hartsfield-Jackson, he has quickly advanced, holding positions in Airport Properties, Operations and Planning, and developing a track record of successful project management and execution.

The American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE) selected Terreri to be a part of its Next-Generation Leaders project, which it describes as ‘A small group of young, rising airport management professionals who will provide feedback, insight, and guidance on how AAAE can best help serve young airport professionals’ career aspirations.’

He is also involved with the Federal Aviation Administration’s NextGen project for overhauling the national airspace system, and in 2010 was awarded a NASA Fellowship Grant for his research.

Terreri serves as an adviser and mentor to several collegiate aviation programs and aspiring aviation professionals nationwide, and he regularly speaks to industry and community groups about airport management.

Terreri holds a bachelor’s degree in Airport Management from the Florida Institute of Technology and a Master of Public Administration degree with a concentration in aviation from the University of Nebraska. He earned his Accredited Airport Executive (A.A.E.) designation in 2009.

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