Sparking Respect: Unique facts about the aviation spark plug

Sparking Respect Unique facts about the aviation spark plug By Harry Fenton and Dick Podiak September 1999 Imagine this engineering project: Design an electromechanical device for the aircraft engine that will spark between 90 to 150...


Reinstall the plugs using a new seat gasket and coat the threads of the plug using a special purpose anti-seize compound. Do not use motor oil or other non-approved lubricants because they can coke up under heat, causing the plug to be difficult to remove from the cylinder. Always torque the plug to the engine manufacturer's specifications. Lycoming recommends 35 ft/lb of torque and Continental specifies 25-30 ft/lb.

Undoubtedly, there is more development ahead for the spark plug, as the internal combustion piston engine remains the powerplant of choice for the conceivable future.

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