Security

RE: security By Bonnie Wilson, Airports Council Int'l - North America June 2000 Keep an eye on changing regulations Aviation security in 2000-2001 won't look much different on the surface than it has in the past, though subtle but...


RE: security

By Bonnie Wilson, Airports Council Int'l - North America

June 2000

Keep an eye on changing regulations
Aviation security in 2000-2001 won't look much different on the surface than it has in the past, though subtle but important changes are on their way. Some airports and air carriers will find themselves responsible for carrying out security programs to a larger extent than they have previously.

The Federal Aviation Administra-tion has been working with the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) to find a way to re-categorize airports for the purposes of security on a more comprehensive basis than the criteria applied in the past.

Members of the ASAC requested the FAA take a look at airports and air carrier activity in the context of probable threat, and other security related concerns, and to work with the local security consortia to determine what "category" an airport should be.

FAA will be working with airports and carriers to reassign categories, and the security responsibilities that go with them, through the Airport Security Program Amendment process. As these category changes are made, airports, air carriers, security service providers, and other tenants may see their roles and responsibilities for providing aviation security change as well. In cases where the airport's category is "raised responsibilities" for passenger and baggage screening, access control and other security measures will increase accordingly.

REWRITES THIS SUMMER
Other changes will come about with the issuance of the "new" security regulations for airports and air carriers — 14 CFR Parts 107 and 108. These long-standing regulations have been in the rewrite process almost as long as they have been in effect. FAA predicts that a final version of both rules will be issued in June/July of 2000. The changes to the regulations are not expected to be drastic in nature, though the regulations are comprehensive and will require all regulated parties to undertake an extensive review of their existing security programs to reflect the new way of doing business.

A recurring theme of the proposed regulations is that all parties with access privileges in the secure area of the airport have the responsibility to uphold and maintain the security system.

One new program area reflecting this change is a requirement for airports and air carriers to establish programs to ensure individual employee compliance with airport and air carrier security programs. Commonly referred to as "individual accountability", the new requirement will impose penalties for non-compliance on the individual who violates the rules and regulations, not on their employer as was common practice in the past.

EXCLUSIVE AREA AGREEMENTS
Non-air carrier tenants will also be given the opportunity to accept a larger role in providing security at airports. Under the existing regulations air carriers may enter into exclusive use or exclusive area agreements with the airport and the FAA under which they provide for access control and other "107" security responsibilities. The proposed regulations would allow non-air carriers tenants to enter into similar agreements with airports, whereby they would be responsible for providing overall security and access control measures for specific areas of the airport.

REDRAWING THE SIDA FAA's
new regulation also proposes to remove security requirements where they may not be needed by allowing airports to redraw the Security Identification Display Area (SIDA) — or secure area of the airport — closer to the terminal building and commercial aircraft operations. These and other changes to access control procedures, identification/access media applications and recordkeeping, signage, training requirements, and incident reporting procedures will keep aviation security professionals busy as they implement the new regulations.

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