Bye Bye Redbird: City of Dallas, tenants invest to create an executive alternative

Bye Bye Redbird City of Dallas, tenants invest to create an executive alternative By John F. Infanger July 2002 The City of Dallas expects to break ground on a new terminal building and control tower by October...


Bye Bye Redbird

City of Dallas, tenants invest to create an executive alternative

By John F. Infanger

July 2002

Dallas Executive Airport Restaurant
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The City of Dallas expects to break ground on a new terminal building and control tower by October 2003. Two of three proposals call for keeping the contract tower attached.
Kenneth Gwyn, director of aviation, City of Dallas Anchor Tenants
The revitalized Dallas Exec-utive Airport has some 21 independent businesses that have invested or committed to invest more than $7 million into their facilities, according to City of Dallas aviation director Kenneth Gwyn. The four anchor tenants on the airport include:
o Akridge Aircraft Interiors, Inc. - corporate aircraft refurbishment. Company plans to have a satellite facility in-house for IFR Avionics, based in Van Nuys, CA.
ยช Cutter Aviation - FBO and Piper Service Center.
o Dallas Aircraft Services - FBO.
o Jet Center of Dallas - FBO.

Cutter GM On Secondary Containment ...
Andy Biery, operations manager for the new Cutter Aviation FBO at Dallas Executive, recently oversaw construction of a new fuel farm. In light of recent EPA enforcement of secondary containment requirements for refuelers, we offer some of his edited comments.

"Our plans for a new fuel farm have been expanded, scrapped, stretched, reduced, and alternatives sought.
"When we first learned of [the secondary containment issue], we tried to scrap our plans to build a fuel farm as its budget had doubled, and attempted to work out deals with our neighbors to share existing farms on the field.
"We were eventually informed that current code, including all new regulations such as offloading containment, will not be grandfathered and that soon all fuel farms will be required to comply or be removed from service. At this point, we determined that it was in our best interest to design a new fuel farm.
"It has been a long and arduous process to build a state of the art fuel farm, one which has the capability to meet future requirements, allows contained parking of refueler trucks, complies with all regulations today, and will do so even as we modify it during expansion.
"Is it possible to comply? The answer is certainly yes. It is expensive? Very."

Location has always been one of the airport's selling points. As the city says, "10 minutes and 1 traffic light from downtown Dallas." It is also adjacent to four Interstates (I-20, I-30, I-35, I-45), but is located in a direction opposite of most growth during the past 30 years.
As Love Field, also near downtown, has grown with increasing airline and business aviation activity, the need for another first class business reliever has emerged, explains the city's director of aviation Kenneth Gwyn, who is responsible for both airports. He sees Dallas Executive as an alternative for new tenants, not necessarily a competitor field to Love, and an opportunity to capture more transient traffic.
"We're poised to take advantage of the growth in general aviation, and to be an airport of choice for this area," says Gwyn. "The real market for this airport is the hobby flyer and the transient aircraft. There's an opportunity for more based aircraft, and with an ILS it can be good for training."
Besides the instrument landing system, the airport offers crosswind runways (6,452 feet and 3,800 feet), a dedicated aircraft rescue and firefighting facility, and some 50 acres of developable land for new aviation businesses, explains Dallas Executive airport manager Marvin Poole. The city is willing to put in the necessary infrastructure, including taxiways, once significant businesses show a commitment, says Gwyn.
The airport also has up to 600 acres of adjacent property for compatible business development, according to the city.

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