Blending TSA, Expansion

Blending TSA, Expansion by John Infanger September 2002 Acting MSN director Dave Jensen, right, and deputy director Bill LeGore. Industry Security Briefs The latest from the Transportation Security Administration (TSA...


Blending TSA, Expansion

by John Infanger

September 2002


Acting MSN director Dave Jensen, right, and deputy director Bill LeGore.

Industry Security Briefs

The latest from the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and other sources

• TSA reports that by the end of August it had expected to have sent site survey teams, via contractor Lockheed Martin, to 390 U.S. airports for assessment of checkpoint configuration. At the same time, contractor Boeing was expected to have visited 250 airports to assess locations for explosive detection equipment.
• Federal security directors (FSDs), appointed by TSA, tell the Senate Commerce Committee that they expect to have open lines of communication with airport operators and other airport stakeholders.
• Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge is quoted in Kansas City and St. Louis newspapers as favoring the extension of the year-end luggage screening deadlines. According to AIRPORTS, Ridge’s office later backed away from the remarks.
• The Aviation Security Enhancement Act, sponsored by Rep. Kay Granger (R-TX), would give TSA more flexibility in meeting the 2002 deadlines, and would require airports to notify the agency by Nov. 1 if they will be unable to meet them. TSA and the airports would then work together on an alternative plan. A similar bill is under consideration in the Senate.
• TSA publishes in the August 8 Federal Register its interim rules (TSAR 1503) for investigative and enforcement procedures, which become effective February 8, 2003. Rule reportedly reflects most existing FAA procedures.



Examination of how Madison, WI, is moving forward, adjusting
MADISON, WI — On 9/11/01, executives at Dane County Regional Airport (MSN) were in the midst of reconstructing their terminal, itself not 20 years old. A strong air carrier market was growing at 3 percent per year. The airport’s infrastructure needed to grow. During the past year, officials here have adjusted and modified and kept building. The main questions unanswered: Will TSA buy in? And, will it all work?\

Acting airport director David C. Jensen and his team have worked to keep the overall renovation project moving, while trying to anticipate modifications that might be required by the Transportation Security Administration. Acting deputy director William G. LeGore estimates the airport has already spent some $1 million in modifications to the original $58 million project.
Says Jensen, "We’re probably ahead of most airports because of where we were in our expansion plans. Immediately after 9/11, with what we saw coming down the road, we began a redesign of the building and putting in the threat protection."
Yet, sharing the experience of most U.S. airports since the TSA took over the nation’s airport security responsibility, officials here have had little definitive direction from the agency. In late July, however, the inspection teams of Boeing and Lockheed, TSA agents, came to Madison to conduct their security analysis and hold meetings with airport and airline officials.
Interestingly, a forum of U.S. mayors earlier in the year brought TSA officials to Madison, at which time airport officials were able to spend considerable time with then-TSA Undersecretary John Magaw.
Explains Jensen, "We engaged Magaw to get these teams here earlier because of the design considerations on a project that was in process. And that’s what happened. I understand we had been scheduled for later. The Boeing guy told me, ’You guys got put on the top of the pile.’
"The Boeing and Lockheed teams were very pleased with our plan, and only slight modifications were done."

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