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Blakey to head up Aerospace Industries Association FAA Administrator Marion C. Blakey, who leaves her post in September, reportedly will become president and CEO of the Aerospace Industries Association, which represents aerospace equipment...


Blakey to head up Aerospace Industries Association
FAA Administrator Marion C. Blakey, who leaves her post in September, reportedly will become president and CEO of the Aerospace Industries Association, which represents aerospace equipment manufacturers.

It’s also reported that the Administration is considering a recess appointment to replace Blakey after Congress recesses at the end of the first session of the 110th Congress. In the interim, Deputy Administrator Robert Sturgell likely will be named acting administrator, it’s reported.

[Some 18 industry associations recently wrote a letter to the White House calling on President Bush to not make a recess appointment, and instead go through the full-term nomination process.]

Blakey will succeed AIA’s John W. Douglass, who has served as president and CEO since September 1998.

Focus teams formed to address runway safety
Special teams of federal regulators and airline and airport personnel will be sent to study runway safety over the next two months at more than 20 U.S. airports identified as having the most runway problems. That was among five initial steps recommended during a special one-day Washington conference called in August by FAA Administrator Marion Blakey to address agency concerns, including the pre-dawn crash of a Comair jet last August in Lexington, KY. FAA officials say the agency is assembling its list of airports to study, which they say will not include Lexington.

Blakey convened the conference with 40 reps from airlines, manufacturers, avionics, FAA inspectors, and air traffic controllers — less than a month after the National Transportation Safety Board issued its report on the Lexington crash. The ‘five steps’ to be taken as a result of the meeting:

  • Improve communication and training, add taxiway scenarios to flight simulators used to train pilots.
  • Urge 73 large airports, already under orders to improve painted runway markings, to complete the work in the next two months, rather than by the September 2008 deadline. The group also will study whether more airports should improve markings.
  • Review cockpit taxi and clearance procedures to reduce tasks required of pilots while their planes are moving on the ground, and to see how instructions given by controllers to planes on the ground can be improved.
  • Add air traffic controllers and safety workers to those groups that can use an FAA voluntary, non-punitive system for reporting safety concerns.
    FAA/industry teams will evaluate all aspects of the runway and surface environment, standard operating procedures, markings and signage, according to the agency.

briefings ...

aci—Airports Council Int’l promotes its involvement in the global Runway Safety Initiative (RSI) headed up by the Flight Safety Foundation. The RSI initiative grew out of a workshop at the 2006 ACI World Annual Conference in Capetown. It focuses on three areas of runway safety: runway incursions, runway excursions, and runway confusion. The initiative is designed to determine the extent and success of current runway safety efforts, explore any gaps that now exist in these efforts, and propose interventions and implementation strategies to reduce or eliminate those gaps. An initial catalog of runway safety products has been developed, and specific data on the various runway safety areas has been obtained.

allegiant air, llc—begins service from Peoria (IL) to Williams Gateway Airport (AZ), beginning Oct. 27, and between Williams Gateway and Santa Maria (CA), beginning Oct. 26.

ASIS INTERNATIONAL—of Alex-andria, VA, which represents security professionals, releases its updated ‘All Hazards Risk Management Draft Best Practices Standard;’ available for public review and comment through October 16, 2007. Visit http://www.asisonline.org/guidelines/guidelines.htm.

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