AMTSociety Mx Logs Update

State of AMTSociety Address I would like to continue this month with more on education and partnerships that AMTSociety has agreements with. The first AMTSociety IA renewal consortium program was on Saturday, Sept. 12 in Los Angeles. It was a...


State of AMTSociety Address
I would like to continue this month with more on education and partnerships that AMTSociety has agreements with.
The first AMTSociety IA renewal consortium program was on Saturday, Sept. 12 in Los Angeles. It was a good turnout with excellent presentations from Honeywell, Cirrus Aircraft, Pacific Oil Cooler Service, FedEx, Bell Helicopter, and the FAASteam. The morning break and lunch were provided by Aircraft Appraisals, and the afternoon break was sponsored by Barfield.

ATEC
Friday, Sept. 18 we met with the FAA at AFS-300 Headquarters: Carol E. Giles, manager; Daniel Bachelder, deputy assistant division manager; and Murray Hauling, manager, AFS-350. Edward L. Hall, ASI, and Marcus Cunningham, ASI, represented the FAA. There were 15 ATEC board members in attendance. Items discussed were: Part 147 final report transition to NPRM update from AFS-300; followup and praise for moving IA renewal from one- to two-year cycle; encourage the transition of Form 8610-2 into the IACRA system; encourage ways to make the oral and practical testing process less time consuming (average general, A&P is 20 hours); praise for new FAA-H-8083-30 (ATB), the new FAA-produced general textbook AC 65-9A; discuss DME renewal cycle and FSDO schedule (fiscal year) to accomplish required items; discuss license and certificate terminology displayed on FAA home page; and issues or concerns for ATEC from the FAA.

NCATT
Please see the article on page 33 of the September 2009 AMT magazine.

Northrop Rice Foundation
Friday, Aug. 21 the semiannual Northrop Rice Foundation was held in Houston, hosted by FlightSafety. There were 10 board members in attendance. The main issue discussed was the number of scholarships that were given over this past year and the fact that we will give 60 scholarships out this year in addition to the two from AMTSociety.
Stay safe.
— Tom Hendershot

2009-2010 AMTSociety IA renewal program
Oct. 28, 2009, Sheraton Mahwah Hotel, One International Blvd., Mahwah, NJ
NEW: Nov. 4, 2009, Four Points by Sheraton, 4900 Duckhorn Dr., Sacramento, CA
Nov. 11, 2009, Four Points by Sheraton, One Industry Lane, Pittsburgh, PA
Dec. 9, 2009, Holiday Inn/Sea-Tac Intl. Airport, 17338 International Blvd., Seattle, WA
Jan. 13, 2010, ExpressJet Airlines Training Center, 17445 John F. Kennedy Blvd., Houston, TX
Jan. 27, 2010, Holiday Inn, Atlanta Airport S., 4669 Airport Blvd., Atlanta, GA
Feb. 10, 2010, Hilton Garden Inn, Phoenix Airport N., 3838 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix, AZ
Feb. 24, 2010, Holiday Inn KCI & Expo Center, 11730 N. Ambassador Dr., Kansas City, MO
March 16-17, 2010, Las Vegas Convention Center, Las Vegas, NV, Aviation Industry Expo
March 24, 2010, The Summit Conference & Event Center, 411 Sable Blvd., Aurora, CO

From EAA: Texas A&M
One of the very interesting and unique presentations at EAA was the Cessna 02A Skymaster which is used for extensive Velocity XL-5RG and Stemme 5-10V testing. USAF Major Aaron A. Tucker, doctoral student, Flight Research Laboratory Department of Aerospace Engineering, and Cecil Rhodes, flight mechanic specialist/research assistant, explained the testing that the Flight Research Laboratory conducts.

Here’s Cecil Rhodes’ story: “I began working for Texas A&M in October 2005. My career has taken quite a change since I began here. Sure I still work on airplanes and I still enjoy it, but I am doing so much more that is enjoyable and rewarding and sometimes just plain fun.

“The primary research we are doing is Laminar Flow Control, trying to reduce drag on swept wings. One of the main reasons the Cessna O2 was selected for this project is because it has the hard points on the wings. We attach an airfoil onto the left outboard pylon for the flight testing. We then fly the airplane up to 10,500 feet and cold soak the model for 30 minutes and dive down to get enough speed for the testing. The flight test engineer is then able to manipulate an insert that is in the leading edge of the model and control transition of laminar to turbulent air. The flight test engineer views the model through an infrared camera and can see when transition occurs.

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