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BUSiness buzz Harlan Helps US Airways Express Go Green At PHL: Harlan Global Manufacturing, Kansas City, KS, launched 20 of its new all-electric belt loaders with US Airways Express at the Philadelphia International Airport. The company also rolled out...


BUSiness buzz

Harlan Helps US Airways Express Go Green At PHL: Harlan Global Manufacturing, Kansas City, KS, launched 20 of its new all-electric belt loaders with US Airways Express at the Philadelphia International Airport. The company also rolled out 15 all-electric baggage tractors as part of the airline’s major going green initiative at its Philadelphia facilities. Both the company’s Express HBLE belt loader and Charger baggage tractors use the same state-of-the-art components. The systems are 80 volt AC. Harlan manufactures everything on the machines except for the battery and controller. This includes the recently acquired integrated drive axle system from Speth of Germany.

 

Passenger traffic gets a boost; freight continues to stagnate: The International Air Transport Association announced traffic results for July which showed that passenger travel was up 5.9 percent over July 2010. Freight markets were stagnating with a 0.4 percent demand decline over previous year levels. International passenger markets, which grew by 7.3 percent compared with July 2010, remain stronger on average than domestic markets which showed weaker growth of 3.5 percent year over year. Compared to prerecession levels of early 2008, international passenger traffic has expanded by 12 percent. Had the industry continued to grow at the prerecession pace of 8 percent, international markets would have been about 14 percent higher than today’s levels and a quarter higher than prerecession level. This confirms that the global financial crisis has cost airlines about two full years of growth. Load factors for the total market (domestic and international) have improved by half a percentage point over July 2010 to 83.1 percent. This is equal to the highs recorded in the third quarter of 2010. North American carriers and European carriers were in the lead. Latin American carriers saw the biggest improvement (from 76.5 percent last July to 79.6 percent this year).

 

Finnair in discussions with Swissport for Helsinki Airport: Finnair is in negotiations with Swissport International, Zurich, Switzerland, about baggage and apron services at Helsinki Airport. The aim is to conclude negotiations before the end of the year. “Developing partnership networks is part of Finnair’s key strategy,” said Ville Iho, Finnair’s COO. “We aim for even better quality and cost-efficiency.” Employees working for Barona Handling, currently executing Finnair’s ramp handling activities in the Helsinki hub, would transfer to the service of Swissport under their present terms of employment if the Swissport and Finnair reach an agreement. Swissport International plans to establish a ground handling organization in Helsinki to be able to offer the full range of ground handling services to all airlines operating at Helsinki airport.

 

ALTA member airlines passenger traffic increases 2 percent in July: The Latin American and Caribbean Air Transport Association announced that its member airlines carried 12.7 million passengers in July, up 2.1 percent from the previous year. Traffic grew 1.5 percent and capacity declined 2.8 percent, raising the load factor to 79.4 percent, 3.3 percentage points higher than in July 2010. “The July results are significantly affected by Mexicana’s exit from the market,” said Alex de Gunten, ALTA’s Executive Director. “Excluding Mexicana, passenger growth in July would be 11.2 percent with an increase in traffic of 11.6 percent and capacity at 6.8 percent.” The number of passengers carried year-to-date (January to July) increased 4.1 percent versus the same period of the previous year, reaching 80.4 million passengers. During the aforementioned period traffic rose 5.3 percent, capacity increased 0.3 percent and the passenger load factor reached 75.6 percent.

 

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